Architecture, Construction & Engineering Charter High School

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Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium » Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) - CAASPP testing

Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) - CAASPP testing

Official score reports will be made available early September about the results from the Spring 2015 roll out of the SBAC assessments for 11th grade. Please see links/PDFs for more information about the assessment and how to understand your students score. 


A comprehensive look at the new roll out of assessments in California, starting with the SBAC.

Knowing that public schools are preparing students for the challenges of the future, California has developed a comprehensive plan for high-quality teaching and learning in every school. We have a long way to go, but our work is well under way, with higher academic standards, more decision-making in the hands of schools and communities, and more resources dedicated to schools and to students with the greatest needs.

Gradually, we’re providing more support for teachers, more resources for students and more access to technology. As a result, exciting changes have begun to take place inside our classrooms. Along with reading to follow a story, students are learning to read to cite evidence and draw logical conclusions. They are learning to use math to solve real-world problems rather than merely pick out the right multiple-choice answer.

The system-wide changes we have begun are focused on helping students succeed in the long run, achieving their dreams of college and a career. They will take considerable time and effort to carry out. That’s why the course we’ve set in California is to carefully phase in change as state and local capacity grows.

California’s new assessment system represents the next step in our comprehensive plan to promote high-quality teaching and learning and improve student outcomes. This plan recognizes that assessments can play a role in promoting high-quality instruction.

Teachers in California support these changes because, unlike in other states, the primary purpose of testing here is to support learning, not to impose high-stakes consequences. This approach fits well with California’s new system for funding our schools, which recognizes that decisions about education dollars are best made by parents, teachers and communities themselves.

In a state as diverse and complex as California, adjustments will always be needed to make lasting progress. Patience and persistence will be required to help our schools continue to succeed during this time of transition.